Dysphagia lusoria caused by aberrant right subclavian artery associated with truncus bicaroticus in an 8-month-old girl. Case report and review of literature


Submitted: 27 January 2024
Accepted: 2 April 2024
Published: 16 April 2024
Abstract Views: 376
PDF: 127
HTML: 1
Publisher's note
All claims expressed in this article are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily represent those of their affiliated organizations, or those of the publisher, the editors and the reviewers. Any product that may be evaluated in this article or claim that may be made by its manufacturer is not guaranteed or endorsed by the publisher.

Authors

Dysphagia lusoria is a rare pediatric condition caused by extrinsic compression of the esophagus by an abnormal subclavian artery. The most common congenital abnormality in aortic arch development is an aberrant right subclavian artery. The retroesophageal right subclavian artery is typically symptomatic in 10-33% of cases. The patient, an 8-month-old girl with a history of early dysphagia and stridor, was diagnosed with an abnormal right subclavian artery. She was admitted to the pneumology service multiple times due to stridor, vomiting, and failure to thrive. During hospitalization at the gastroenterology service, a barium swallow and an upper digestive endoscopy indicated an abnormal right subclavian artery, which was confirmed by an Angiography CT scan. She underwent surgery at the age of sixteen months. All symptoms are resolved following surgical intervention, and the patient is still asymptomatic and in good clinical condition 12 months later. Every physician should be aware of abnormal right subclavian arteries and their clinical symptoms in children and adults in order to recognize and diagnose them early. Only an early evaluation may reduce complications such as delayed physical growth, dysphagia, and recurrent respiratory infections.


Natsis K, Didagelos M, Gkiouliava A, et al. The aberrant right subclavian artery: cadaveric study and literature review. Surg Radiol Anat 2017;39:559–65. Erratum in: Surg Radiol Anat 2017 Sep 14.

Kieffer E, Bahnini A, Koskas F. Aberrant subclavian artery: surgical treatment in thirty-three adult patients. J Vasc Surg 1994;19:100e11. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S0741-5214(94)70125-3

Molz G, Burri B. Aberrant subclavian artery (Arteria lusoria): sex differences in the prevalence of various forms of the malformation. Evaluation of 1378 observations. Virchows Archiv A: Pathological Anatomy and Histology 1978;380:303–15. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00431315

Myers PO, Fasel JHD, Kalangos A, Gailtoud P. Arteria lusoria: Developmental anatomy, clinical, radiological and surgical aspects. Ann Cardiol Angeiol 2010;59:147–54. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ancard.2009.07.008

Natsis K, Didagelos M, Gkiouliava A, et al. The aberrant right subclavian artery: cadaveric study and literal review. Surg Radiol Anat 2017;39:559–65. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00276-016-1796-5

Pantvaidya GH, Mistry RC, Ghanekar VR, et al. Injury of an aberrant subclavian artery: a rare complication of video assisted thoracoscopic esophagectomy. Ann Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2005;11:35–7.

Janssen M, Baggen MGA, Veen HF, et al. Dysphagia lusoria: clinical aspects, manometric findings, diagnosis, and therapy. Am J Gastroenterol 2000;95:1411–6. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1572-0241.2000.02071.x

Ulger Z, Ozyurek AR, Levent E, et al. Arteria lusoria as a cause of dysphagia. Acta Cardiologica 2004;59:445–7. DOI: https://doi.org/10.2143/AC.59.4.2005213

Karcaaltincaba M, Haliloglu M, Ozkan E, et al. Non-invasive imaging of aberrant right subclavian artery pathologies and aberrant right vertebral artery. Br J Radiol 2009;82:73–8. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1259/bjr/44929969

Moore KL, Persaud TVN. The developing human: clinically oriented embryology. 6th Ed. Philadelphia: WB Saunders Co.; 1998. pp. 384–394.

Nelson JS, Hurtado CG, Wearden PD. Surgery for Dysphagia Lusoria in Children. Ann Thoracic Surg 2020;109:e131–3. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.athoracsur.2019.05.058

Bizhga, M., Velmishi, V., Sila, L., Koja, A., & Hoxha, S. (2024). Dysphagia lusoria caused by aberrant right subclavian artery associated with truncus bicaroticus in an 8-month-old girl. Case report and review of literature. La Pediatria Medica E Chirurgica, 46(1). https://doi.org/10.4081/pmc.2024.332

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Citations